Article Task 5


Ex. 1. Insert articles where necessary.
1. "Are youbad sailor?” she asked. “About as bad as is possible in spite of having
been atsea so much.” 2. The parcel came bypost. 3. On his trip round the
world with Fleur he had often put his nose out and watched the dancing on_____deck.
He decided that he would not atpresent explain to her who he was. 5.I saw
good deal of him duringwar. 6. He has taken her death very much to____heartindeed. 7. She went bycoach because it was cheaper. 8. All seemed perfectly at
their ease, by no means inhurry. 9.little car inquestion now stood
outsidefront door. 10. Am I dealing, young people, withcase oflove at first sight? 11. We’ve had some tea already onboard____yacht. 12. Rosa was well aware that she had never takentrouble to get to know Annette. 13. You will go to___sea and forget all about me inmonth. 14. He is beginning to lose ____heart, they say. 15. She burned likefire fromhead tofoot. 16. I got into conversation with him bychance atconcert. 17. She’s taken quitefancy to you, Ridgeon. 18.I returned at once, and found Ada sitting at____work by____fireside. 19. Somewhere______great many men were singing. 20. It is pity to worry her if she hastalent for_____uneasiness. 21. Behindhouse waslarge garden, and in summer,____pupils almost lived out-of-doors. 22. rain had stopped and we went on ____foot to ____ Ebury Street. 23. They started atdawn, andboy I sent with them didn’t come back till _____next day. 24. All ofsudden, his face had become stony. 25. Dear, dear! It seems onlyother day since I took you down to school to Slough!
EX. 2. Revision: supply t le required articles in the following text:
In 1923, at ... meeting of ... British Association for ... Advacement of ... Science in Liverpool, Rutherford announced: “We I re living in ... heroic age of ... physics.”
... curious thing was, all he said was absolutely true. There had never been such ... time. ... year 1932 was ... most spectacular year in ... history of ... science. Living in Cambridge, one could not help picking up ... human and intellectual excitement in … air: James Chadwick, grey-faced after ... fortnight of ... work with ... three hours’ sleep ... night, telling ... Kapitsa Club how he had discovered ... neutron; P.M.S. Blackett, ... most handsome of ... men, not quite so authoritative as usual, because it seemed too good to be true, showing ... plates which demonstrated ... existence of ... positive electron; John Cockcroft, normally not given to ... emotional display, saying to anyone whose face he recognized: “We’ve split ... atom!”
During ... twenties and thirties Cambridge was ... metropolis of ... experimental physics for ... entire world. “You’re always at ... crest of ... wave,” someone said to Rutherford. “Well, after all, I made ... wave, didn’t I?” Rutherford replied.
He was ... big, rather clumsy man. He had ... large staring blue eyes and ... damp lower lip. He didn’t look in ... least like … intellectual. His was really ... kind of ... face that often goes with ... character and ... gifts. In ... fact, he came from ... very poor: his father was ... odd-job man in New Zealand and ... son of ... Scottish emigrant.
New Zealand was, in ... 1880s, ... most remote of ... province*, but Rutherford managed to get ... good education. He was as original as Einstein, but unlike Einstein he did not revolt against ... formal instruction; he was top in ... classics as well as in everything else. He started ... research on ... subject of ... wireless waves with ... equipment such as one might dig up today in ... African laboratory. That did not deter him. “I could do research at ... North Pole,” he once proclaimed, and it was true. He brought his wireless work to Cambridge, anticipated Marconi and then dropped it because he saw ... field — ... radio-activity — more scientifically interesting. His work led him directly to ... atomic energy industry, spending ... thousands of ... millions of ... pounds. He himself never earned, or wanted to earn, more than ... professor’s salary. In his will he left precisely ... value of ... Nobel prize. As soon as Rutherford got on to ... radio-activity, he was set on his life’s work. His ideas were simple, rugged, material. He thought of ... atoms as though they were ... tennis balls. He discovered ... particles smaller than ... atoms, and discovered how they moved or bounced. Sometimes ... particles bounced ... wrong way. Then he inspected ... facts and made ... new but always simple picture. In that way he moved, as certainly as ... sleepwalker, from ... unstable radioactive atoms to ... discovery of ... nucleus and ... structure of ... atom. In 1919 he made one of ... significant discoveries of all ... time: he broke up ... nucleus of ... nitrogen by ... direct hit from ... alpha particle. That is, ... man could now get inside ... atomic nucleus.

Приложенные файлы

  • docx 24024629
    Размер файла: 20 kB Загрузок: 0

Добавить комментарий