British and American Weekends


British and American Weekends
People all across the globe look forward to the weekend and spend the whole week waiting for the weekend to arrive. The weekend is a chance to be at home with one’s family or to spend time on a sport or hobby, a chance to go out somewhere. The weekend is a chance to go home and admire the contrast between the hustle and bustle of the big city and to return into the peace of one’s hometown or village. One can surf the net so as to take in some music or spend time chatting on the phone with one’s friends, go for an outing in the country or enjoy one’s home. This is a pretty universal practice. Yet, this is how people in the UK and in the US spend their weekends:
In The weekend lasts from the end of working hours or school hours on Friday until Monday morning. For most people it is a chance to be at home with their family, spend time on a sport or hobby or to go out somewhere. People can to meet up for a game of football or go to the gym for a work-out. Depending on the season, the weather and the mood people can go camping, hiking, fishing, sailing or boating, some might ctually prefer to go skating or skiing or climbing
Both adults and children look forward to the freedom of the weekend and to having time to please themselves. On Friday people with jobs may say TGIF (Thank God it’s Friday) and may go to a bar together after work. People who work in factories, shops and restaurants and on buses often have to work at weekends and instead get time off during the week. Sometimes people take an extra day off on Friday or Monday to make a long weekend, especially if they want to have a short holiday/vacation. Several holidays, such as Spring Bank Holiday in Britain and Memorial Day in the US, are on a Monday to create a long weekend.
At the weekend (AmE On the weekend) people may do jobs around the house (do the dusting, run the vacuum cleaner over the floor), look after their garden, wash the car, play sport or watch television. On Saturday mornings many US television channels show cartoons. The weekend is also the busiest time of the week for shopping. Shops are open on both Saturday and Sunday. For a long time many British people opposed Sunday trading and wanted to “keep Sunday special”, but there was pressure from some of the largest stores and DIY shops to be allowed to open, and now many people like shopping on a Sunday.
Friday and Saturday nights are popular, especially among young people, for parties and visits to clubs and pubs. Young people go out on the town and enjoy all the nightlife that is on offer. People also go to the theatre or cinema, eat out at a restaurant, or invite friends to their house for dinner or a barbecue.
On Sundays many people have a lie-in. Some people go to church on Sunday morning. In the US many adults enjoy reading the newspaper while eating brunch, a combination of breakfast and lunch that includes dishes from both. Brunch is eaten between about 10 and 12 in the morning and is enjoyed in a relaxed atmosphere. In Britain some people sit around and read the Sunday papers. They may have other members of the family for Sunday lunch. Many people go out for a walk or visit a theme park, stately home or other attraction, depending on their interests. In summer many families go out for the day to the countryside.
In general people are very busy at the weekend and often finish it more tired than they began it, so for many Monday morning is the least pleasant part of the week.

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